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Sunday, September 28, 2014

First Bookstore Appearance of ‘Fool’s Illusion’ and Ebook Price to Increase


Wizard reading a book and a skull sitting on a book stack.
Photo Credit: Openclipart.org



The Fool’s Illusion has finally made its appearance in its first brick-and-mortar bookstore! I delivered two copies to The Avid Reader in Davis Wednesday afternoon to be sold on consignment.

Why purchase books (not just mine but in general) at a brick-and-mortar store when you can simply do that at online stores such as Amazon? With online shopping you don’t have to leave your seat in front of your computer or you can shop from anywhere using your mobile device. But, more than any online bookstore, independently owned brick-and-mortar bookstores bring their local communities together and promote those communities’ authors. The money that goes into the community business revenue keeps the local bookstore in business which is a meeting place for both authors and readers alike who can discuss their favorite books in a real time and space setting.

The locally owned bookstore is a kind of literary town hall that gives the community an opportunity to meet its authors. It also introduces local readers to a new book of their favourite genre, a book produced in their very hometown or area. In addition to this, it helps local readers meet each other face to face in a way that may be harder or less intimate to do online where, like with us authors, billions of readers the world over are competing for recognition even if unintentionally. Purchasing at your locally owned bookshop (at least when it comes to area authors) creates possibilities for a fan base to spring up in your community, a fan base that isn’t just a following of the author but a sub-community of local fans of the book’s genre itself. For example, in a similar way Harry Potter or The Hunger Games has created a sci fi or fantasy fan base on a nation-wide level through the chain bookstore, a local author’s book of either of those same genres can do the same on a local level through an independently owned bookstore.  

I’m not saying that online bookstores are inferior to local ones. The more distribution of books there is, the better not just for their authors, sellers, distributors or publishers, but for the world’s readers to access them. Online book distribution gives readers easier and better access to authors and their work that may not be so easily accessible through local or even big chain bookstores. While online book distribution brings the world’s readers together, local book distribution does the same with local readers. Plus, simply the presence of an area author’s book in a locally owned bookshop reflects and perpetuates the local culture, particularly in the arts.

Fool’s Illusion will eventually reach many other bookstores in the Sacramento area. I’ll keep you updated on that. Meanwhile, if you missed out on The Fool’s Illusion first anniversary giveaway, don’t despair. You can still purchase the ebook version for only 99 cents at Amazon. But I wouldn’t wait too long. By Wednesday of next week (October 1st) the ebook version rises to at least $2.99!


Until next time . . . 

2 comments:

  1. I agree with you about local book stores. We have one B&N left and I wouldn't be surprised if it closes within a year or two. I love browsing books in real life rather than online.

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    1. It's so much more engaging when you can browse books in real life rather than online. It provides a greater experience in getting out there and experiencing the literary environment and culture rather than simply mouse-clicking more or less passively through books on a website.

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