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Saturday, August 12, 2017

Tools Not to Miss if You Self-Publish a Paperback

If you happen to not have purchased the paperback copy of “Circa Sixty Years Dead” then no worries. You may be better off waiting a few days and I’ll leave it at its initial low price of $3.89 a little longer. The reason I’m saying this is because, as I promised you last post, I purchased a copy myself as kind of a proof (or author’s) copy. It turned out to be a proof alright. A proof that it didn’t come out the way I intended it to. I confess much of this was due to myself missing overlooking certain tools on Kindle Direct Publishing’s cover creator program.

If you happened to have bought a copy of the paperback version of “Circa” you probably noticed a long, ugly, gray line running along the left edge of the front cover. Not only that, but the lettering of the title and the image under it were pixelated. “Circa” is not a cyberpunk story, so the pixelated edges won’t work for customers. I apologise if you bought it like that.


A pixelated, retro video game-style monster.
Credit: Pixabay.com



The problem is that the previewer in the book cover creator is not a precise image of what the product will look like in actuality and therefore in print. But as I said last post, we would take the risk together and I definitely took that risk. So we both wasted $3.89. But it’s not a total waste. We paid to see how well the book would turn out, and if you read it I sure hope the story at least turned out way the hell better than the cover did and that you got some of your money’s worth. So what you can do is, if you haven’t done so yet, leave a review on “Circa”’s Amazon page  and I’m perfectly fine with you saying the book cover sucks if you really think it does, because it does.

In the meantime, ever since I received my “proof” a couple days ago in the mail, I have been doing all I can to improve the cover. I confess there were some tools on the cover creator that I had somehow missed and using them could have prevented this screw up. If you happen to be planning to self-publish a paperback, espcially through Kindle Direct, take this as a warning not to miss any of these tools. One of these was a “3-D” view mode which allows you to manipulate the position of the image of the book so you can see front, back and spine.

Another tool was one that scales the image on the book cover. Kindle Direct strongly recommends all images are a minimum of 300 dpi (dots per inch). Using this tool, if you scale the image to a low enough or high enough percentage it will likely get rid of the pixelation and any blurriness the image may show when it comes out in print. In my case I had to scale the cover’s image down to about 23.-something (I can’t remember the exact percentage) in order to get it to the 300 minimum dpi. Once I did that, I relaunched the book and so hopefully it will be available in its improved form for purchase in the next day or two. And, because Kindle Direct doesn’t offer free or even discounted proofs, I will purchase another copy for myself once the improved form is available.

I’ll let you know more what happens with the relaunch of “Circa”’s paperback edition next time. Also next time, I’ll have news on the logo I’ve been working on for my self-publishing imprint. In the mean time, for you fellow self-publishing writers out there, have you tried KindleDirect Publishing’s paperback publishing tool yet? If so, what have your experiences been with it?

Until next time . . .


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